Goodnight, Good Guy – Collective Soul – Hints Allegations & Things Left Unsaid

  • Posted on March 9, 2018 at 1:21 PM

Collective Soul’s Ed Roland And Jesse Triplett Discuss New Live Album, the Origin of “Shine”Band compiled ‘Collective Soul: Live’ out of more than 160 live recordings made over the last two years. Band compiled ‘Collective Soul: Live’ out of more than 160 live recordings made over the last two years. Following the release of their ninth full-length album, 2015’s See What You Started by Counting, Collective Goodnight, Good Guy – Collective Soul – Hints Allegations & Things Left Unsaid made the conscious decision to record more than 160 of their shows over the course of the next two years.

Collective Soul rose to fame in 1993 with Hints, Allegations and Things Left Unsaid, a collection of frontman Ed Roland’s demos bolstered by the monster hit, “Shine. 1 hits and album sales, while simultaneously helping to define rock with their guitar-driven attitude. Guitar World recently spoke with Roland and the band’s guitarist, Jesse Triplett, about Collective Soul’s new live album, music, gear and more in this exclusive new interview. What made the band decide to record a live album? Ed Roland: Jesse joined the band about five years ago and our drummer, Johnny Rabb, joined right before that. After 24 years, I feel this is without a doubt the best line-up we’ve ever had and I’ve always said that once we caught the groove, we needed to get it down.

So when we started to tour after our last album, , we recorded every show. How did you determine which live versions to include? Roland: Of course, every night you want to do the best that you can, but some nights were better than others. We gave him the weeks we thought were good and let him pick and choose. The only thing we made clear was that we wanted no overdubs. We just wanted what it was that night. Jesse Triplett: Shawn came out and saw us at a few different spots during the tour.

There were so many shows that I sometimes forgot we were recording for a live album. Is there any set of extra nerves knowing that you’re recording a live show and there’s no going back? Roland: Jesse and I both like to move around on stage, so when we first started talking about recording we were concerned about how far we should take the showmanship and how much we should reel it back and make sure we we’re playing correctly. Jesse mentioned about forgetting that we were being recorded and I think that really helped with the mindset of doing the show without thinking. Triplett: If you start thinking about it, it gets weird. It’s better to just get out there and play instead of trying to be technically sound.

Roland: Being a front man, you also have to play with a crowd and know how to entertain and bring them in and take them out. I never wanted to be withdrawn from that by having to think about singing something perfectly. It was more about letting it flow, catching the groove and forgetting about it. What can you tell me about it? Roland: When we started to tour last year we already had songs for the new studio record. So, we decided to throw some of them into the show to see what kind of response we would get.

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